This is the Haunted Saint Antony Hotel. One of the San Antonio Haunted Hotels.

Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel in San Antonio. This legendary hotel is just one of many haunted hotels in the area that promise to deliver an eerie and unique experience. Whether you’re a thrill-seeker or simply curious, the Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel is the perfect destination for you. Don’t miss your chance to stay at the iconic Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel and immerse yourself in its ghostly history. Come explore the paranormal activity at the infamous Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel and other haunted hotels in the area.

The St. Anthony Hotel, located in San Antonio, Texas, just a stone’s throw away from Travis Park, has quite a history behind it. It was one of the first luxury hotels in the Lone Star State and even had the honor of being the world’s first hotel to offer central air-conditioning. Many famous figures have stayed at the hotel, including Fred Astaire, George Clooney, John Wayne and Arnold Schwarzenegger. After an extensive renovation in 2013, the hotel has been restored to its former glory. But one thing that has remained unchanged is the hotel’s ghostly population, which is quite fond of the place.

Reports Have Surfaced Of A Female Figure Wearing A Red Dress

Reports have surfaced of a female figure, wearing a red dress, roaming the Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel halls. She remains nameless despite her death and has been seen entering the women’s bathroom. Witnesses have seen her heels clicking on the marble floor as she walked into the first stall of the restroom and then vanishing. 

The women standing at the sinks are often left wondering if their eyes are playing tricks on them when the legs seen beneath the divider suddenly disappear. It is thought that she died in the hotel after having a heart attack in her room and that the spirit is merely re-living her last moments on Earth.

What The Locker Room Has Paranormal Activity

Reports of spectral sightings in the employee locker room downstairs have been made by those gathering their things at the end of a shift, who experience a feeling of being watched. Doors to this hotel area are said to open and close independently, and eerie footsteps on the floor can be heard even when no one is present. 

Additionally, sounds of someone washing up in one of the empty stalls have been heard, and those who dare may even see shadow figures in the locker room. It is unknown who these paranormal encounters may belong to, but those who are brave can venture down and see if they encounter any of these apparitions or ghostly footsteps.

The Anacacho Ballroom in The St. Anthony

The Anacacho Ballroom in The St. Anthony Hotel is a two-storied space, distinguished by its magnificent chandeliers that twinkle and brighten up the room better than any disco ball could. The room is used for classes, corporate meetings, and weddings. However, it is also said to be haunted. One of the hotel’s security guards was doing his rounds when he stopped by the Anacacho Ballroom to check that everything was in order. As he was about to leave, he heard the deadbolt lock and then detected the sound of someone kicking the door. He was utterly petrified, yet no one was there when he opened the door. He later confessed that he had never experienced fear like that before, with a chill running up his back and a certainty that he was not alone.

Who Died In Room 536

1965 The Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel encountered a mysterious, gruesome murder case. This story, which occurred in two locations, must be told in two parts. On the same street, a housekeeper at the Gunter Hotel was bringing fresh towels to Room 636 when she noticed the “Do Not Disturb” sign on the door. She opened the door to find the room splattered with blood. A man stood beside the bed, leaning over a cardboard box filled with a bundle of blood-soaked brown paper bags. 

Maria Luisa Guerra screamed, and the murderer escaped. But there was nobody. Two days after the murder, a man checked into the Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel under Robert Ashley. When police arrived, they found a lock of brown hair, lipstick-smeared cigar butts, checks, and more brown paper bags. 

The police found a check from a restaurant where “Robert Ashley” had taken someone and uncovered his real name as Walter Emerick. He had even visited Sears to purchase a meat grinder. He requested Room 636, but it was already taken, so he settled for Room 536. 

When cops arrived at The St. Anthony Hotel to arrest Emerick, he took his own life with a .22. The woman he was seen with before the murder was never found. 

Even today, the fifth floor of The St. Anthony Hotel gives the employees a strange feeling. After the 2013-2015 renovations, Room 536 was split into two separate rooms.

Haunted Saint Anthony Hotel By The Early 1900's

San Antonio had seen a significant change at the turn of the century. It was a cattle town and a defensive stronghold for the Southwest and Mexico. This change was triggered when the Sunset Route established a railway station in the city in 1877.

This caused a surge in its economy, and by the early 1900s, San Antonio had become the most populous city in Texas. It was the perfect place for ambitious entrepreneurs like F.M. Swearingen, who had previously managed the Hot Springs Resort Hotel of San Antonio. He was nicknamed one of America’s four unique cities, including Boston, San Francisco, and Boston.

Swearingen’s dream had been realized. To make his dreams a reality, he got the support of two wealthy cattle barons, B.L. Nayler and H.H. Jones, who became the Mayor of San Antonio soon after. They provided the funds for Swearingen to buy Samuel B. Maverick’s land and demolish his house, converting the orchard into Travis Park.

The St. Anthony Hotel was completed with a budget of $500,000, featuring illuminated closets, bedroom lights that turn off when the door is shut, and each bedroom a private bathroom – it was the epitome of luxury.

Depression Aera Set In

The St. Anthony Hotel experienced a successful grand opening in 1909, with the construction of one tower followed by a second shortly afterward. The nightly rate was high, making the hotel’s clientele usually of a higher class. However, when America’s economy went into recession in 1935, the hotel needed to take drastic measures to stay afloat. 

Ralph W. Morrison took on the challenge, disregarding the advice of his financial advisors, and bought the failing hotel. He added two extra stories, connecting the two towers and creating a central air-conditioning unit. He also installed the first auto lobby and filled the hotel’s interior with French Empire antique furniture, oil paintings, tapestries, and sculptures. The hotel was so beautiful. It was suitable for both those of noble birth and those who attained their position through their own efforts.

 

The Nightclub Was The Third Most Popular In The Country

The St. Anthony Hotel has been the ideal location for an exclusive club since its founding in 1959, for it was the largest In the Southwest; this nightclub was the third most popular in the entire country. High-profile figures and celebrities from around the globe were among the invited members, and the club’s live music was even broadcasted across the US. It was the place to be if you were important, while it was a place of envy for the rest. Sadly, the club no longer exists, although visitors can still take a tour of the area.

The Haunted Saint Anthony Today

Between 2013 and 2015, The Hunted Saint Anthony Hotel underwent a major renovation, the most recent one since the 1980s. All the antiques Ralph E. Morrison had brought to the hotel were restored, and even the Venetian-tile mosaics were polished to a shine after being revealed beneath the flooring layers. The St. Anthony Hotel’s website proudly states it delivers a renaissance of glamour. It is a place where the grandeur and grace of the past coexist with the conveniences of the present, all accompanied by renowned Texas hospitality. However, if one were to stay at The St. Anthony, one would realize that there is one more aspect to this Texas hospitality – all the ghosts.